1 on 1 stituations

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What game stituations does a ice hockey player face?

1 on 1 stituations

1 ON 1 SITUATIONS
1 - 1 offense
* The goal is to have the puck carrier become a threat to score and force the defender to challenge him instead of allowing the defender to dictate the play.
* In an outside lane, attack from the side of defender and use change of pace and big moves. At the offensive blue line read if the defender gives up the
blue line. If he backs in, cut inside, if he stands up or is slow then go wide.
* Using various moves, and speeds forces the defender to think of various ways to defend and this slows his reaction and gives the attacker the advantage.

1 - 1 defense
* Try to stop the attacker as far as possible from the defensive zone.
* The goal is prevent the attacker from getting a shot from the slot.
* If attacker is very fast give room wide rather than back in.
* When the attacker is in an outside lane turn when he is parallel to you and flare out square to attacker, then angle him to the corner and finish.
* Stay on defensive side blocking way to net or angling attacker into corner.
* If the attacker delays you must stay with him and continue 1-1 beating him back to the net if he passes.

   

Comments

7/14/2009 11:23:49 PM
JT said:

In the 1-1 Offense Situation - you mention "backing in". Almost every good defender gives up the blue line on a 1 on 1 and back into the defensive zone. A good defender back up at a slower pace than the attacking player to "suck him in closer" allowing the attacker to close the gap until about the top of the circles, where they then make their move to force attacker to the outside or to their backhand.
Defenders who try to "take them at the blue line" get burned most times as the attacker has momentum and can easily make a move around and has enough space to recover and cut in on goal.
Also, any defense-man worth his salt is able to skate backwards faster than an attacker can skate forward and staying skating backwards allows him to watch the attacker and keep himself between the shooter and the net.

Regarding 1 -1 defense:
Many times it is bad strategy to attack the attacker on open ice. The attacker can skirt around you and has much room to cut back to the goal. It is better to keep the attacker in front of you and "suck them in" to where they have no chance to slip by you -or- they are forced to either pass, take a bad shot, or skate outside and behind your net.
And NEVER turn when an attacker is "PARALLEL" to you, it is too late - if the attacker is going to burn by you (you can't skate backward fast enough) 1) you were probably not reading the play correctly and 2) ned to learn how to skate backward faster.
If you find yourself needing to turn due to a fast attacker, you need to turn toward the attacker, have a very fast and practiced transition, and do it just before the skater gets to you - usually when they are at 2:00 (or 10:00) when you are skating backward. This way they cannot cut back when you turn (if they were looking for the turn) but you have one step on them which will probably just allow you to catch them since you will lose speed in the transition and they will still be going full steam. and watch the attackers chest - not the puck or their head/eyes. Where the chest goes, their body goes.




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